Monday, June 30, 2014

Strike Indicators

Strike indicators can be a very helpful tool when nymphing or fishing wet flies. I have tried a lot of different indicators since I have started fly fishing. I have two kinds of indicators that I always have on hand.


https://spiritriver.com/accessories/strike-indicators/tip-off-strike-detectors

The first indicator is made by Spirit River. The Spirit River tip off strike indicator is a yarn indicator that is awesome for slow riffles and slow current. I try to treat every twitch or unnatural movement as a hit and more often than not end up with a fish on the end of my line. This indicator is great for picking up the softest takes. Make sure you have some dry fly floatant, this will help you keep your indicator right on top of the water. I usually apply floatant at the beginning of the day and won't apply new floatant until the next trip. This indicator comes in a few different sizes and colors including, black, green, white, red, and yellow all in micro or large. I have tried every color but black. I usually have white or red, that is just my preference. A package of four are $4.00 on the Spirit River website. I usually pick mine up at Sportsman's Warehouse where micro cost $3.29 and large cost $3.59.



http://westwaterproducts.com/thingamabobber.html

 The second indicator is made by WestWater Products. This indicator is called the Thingamabobber. I find myself nymphing more and more with this indicator. It is a small plastic balloon like indicator that can be used in many water types. I like to use it when I'm fishing waterfall pools, fast currents, rapids and pretty much any kind of water that will pull yarn flies right under. It's not as sensitive as the yarn indicators so if you use it in slow water there is a good chance that you will miss small takes. The company has just recently released a new half n half thingamabobber that has easier detection of more subtle hits. I have not tried this half n half thingamabobber yet but I plan on ordering a few to give them a try. The indicator comes in a variety of colors and sizes starting from 1/2" to 1 and 1/4" in diameter. You can pick up a pack of 5 indicators for $4.99 at Sportsman's Warehouse. I know there are many different brands and types of indicators.

I would love to hear what indicators you use. I'm always looking to try new products.

 -Mike Clemmer


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Wednesday, June 25, 2014

creekside fly fishing




I'm very excited about our creekside video. We were able to get some nice fish on for the video. Although, doesn't it always work out that the fishing is always best when the camera isn't rolling? I have fished many small creeks where only a roll cast usually only a few feet up stream is all that is possible, which can be a lot of fun. This is actually a pretty good sized creek with some nice bends and deep holes. It's nice to find a creek about this size because there seems to always be a few hogs and you can find a few holes to throw your line around without ending up in the top of a tree. Snags and navigation are just a few of the challenges when fishing small streams. Small creeks usually have very clean, clear water and fish seem to always be easily spooked and they can be very picky at times. Most of the time you only have one or two tries to present perfectly. One thing that I have found fishing creeks is to never assume that you know where "all" of the fish are. Of course trout will hang out in all of the places you would expect, but fish can end up hanging out in places you wouldn't usually try to fish. I try to cast out into anything that looks promising at all. Look for small undercuts in the bank, shallow or deep. Fast white water under pools is also a great place to hook into a few fish with some size. Any kind of structure is going to have a hiding place for fish, but sometimes fish will just bury themselves in the mud and wait for lunch or dinner to show up on the water. I always like to cast dries onto flat water that has weeds and mud underneath. Be creative, have fun and don't get frustrated, a few snags or bruises on your shins while fly fishing beats the heck out of working at home in the yard. I hope that you can find success in the small creeks close to you. Next time you're on your way to your favorite river to fish, stop and fish a few of the creeks you pass on the way. You might find a nice honey hole that produces some healthy nice sized trout.

Thanks for taking a look into our world!

-Mike Clemmer

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Wednesday, June 18, 2014

fresh air



I think one of the best parts about fly fishing is getting away from your daily grind to step out and enjoy some fresh air. Things become simple....don't drown and catch fish. Fresh air was filmed in northern Utah on and near the Ogden and Weber rivers. These are a few of my favorite places to step back and breathe.
Most of the filming took place between March and April. In the video I hooked into a 21 inch rainbow up on a dirt bank 5 feet off the creek. I stepped down on to some mud that had slid off in the water and I completely lost my footing. My waders started filling up with freezing spring run off water, luckily it was shallow and I was able to pop right up and land the fish. After taking my first spill out on the water alone, I have started to pay a lot more attention where I put my footing.
I hope that you enjoy fresh air and fishiki!

-Mike Clemmer

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Friday, June 13, 2014

Beginning of Fishiki

Hello, Welcome to fishiki. I have been slowly putting together my blog over the past few days and I'm still trying to piece everything together so please excuse the dust. Once I have everything together I have a lot of adventures, pictures and videos I want to put up as soon as possible. I also have a few products that I'd like to share that have really helped me begin my fly fishing life as well. I'd love to hear from anyone and everyone about their recent fly fishing trips and adventures. I look forward to sharing fishiki with everyone and our passion for fly fishing. Fishiki is a group of friends and family that have just recently been introduced to fly fishing over the past few years. After a few years out on the water I want to share some of our memories, techniques, and places we love to fish. Trust me when I say we are not experts, we are just the average Joes doing our best to avoid tangles, snags and get into a few fish. Thanks for taking the time to stop by and take a look into our world. -Mike Clemmer

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